ASL CARDS FOR BABY

High-Contrast Cards for Babies
in American Sign Language

$20 CAD (Approximately $16 USD*)
 

ASL Cards for Baby is the first of its kind that has been designed for babies. It is a collection of six high-contrast art cards in American Sign Language.

 

In this set are 12 designs printed on 6 cards:
FIRE, MOUNTAIN, OCEAN, RAIN, TREE & WIND.

 

The cards correspond with the Canadian landscape, along with the 5-handshape to create a sense of rhythm in between the signs. A guide for families on how to use these cards is also included in each set.

*US exchange rate may vary.

Product Description

We are a Deaf-owned, parent-owned company and we believe it is our responsibility to provide signing parents with the best tools for their child’s development. The best way to do this is through high-level sensory stimulation. That is where we bring in ASL Cards for Baby! It is an innovative way to promote your baby’s visual development as they learn American Sign Language. 

 

From the very first day of life, studies have shown that babies can see high-contrast patterns from 8 to 12 inches away. It also has been proven that babies start to communicate through sign language earlier than spoken language, and that signing promotes bonding. By using these cards, you are encouraging your baby’s visual and cognitive skills as they learn a language and develop their eyesight.

 

Beautifully printed on 5 by 7-inch board material, with rounded corners for safety. These cards are also made to be sturdy for babies, as they explore and sign.

Specs:

  • 12 designs on 6 cards

  • 5 x 7" flashcards

  • Printed on 400gsm mounted with 400gsm paper for durability

  • Printed on FSC certified white paper

  • Fully printed, shrink-wrapped tuck box

  • Simple, easy to follow instructional guide for families

  • Designed in Canada by Deaf women

  • Printed in China

ENTERTAINING

Baby holding Baby Card

Entertain your baby easily with ASL Cards for Baby as babies are easily captivated to high-contrast images for minutes on end.

STIMULATING

Baby playing with baby cards

Research suggests that high-contrast shapes and patterns can actually provide babies with something simple and engaging that can actually hold their attention and gaze. Using ASL Cards for Baby may help signing babies' visual skills as signing does help "shape gaze behaviour" in infants (Bosworth and Stone, 2021).

EDUCATIONAL

Dad teaching baby sign.

There are countless benefits of signing with your baby!

 

Research by Thompson et al. has discovered that there has been a significant reduction in crying and whining, since signing promotes clear communication and enhances parent-child bonding.
 

Get a head start in using ASL with your baby by using ASL Cards for Baby!

AND FUN FOR ALL

Baby playing with baby cards

Our ASL Cards for Baby is the perfect toy to promote your baby's neck strength while sitting up or lying on their tummy.

 

Crawling babies and toddlers also find them fun to play with!​

Christy Headshot - sitting on chair.

About the Creative:
 

Christy Jeffery is the creative behind ASL Cards for Baby, which was inspired by her then 2-month old daughter Quinn who loved to look at high-contrast cards.

About the Graphic Designer:
 

Nina Guévremont is the oh-so talented Deaf graphic designer behind ASL Cards for Baby. She is a freelance graphic designer living in Victoria, BC. In her spare time, she absolutely loves exploring nature, relaxing at home with her cat Magnus, and living life. Find her at twelvepixels.ca!

Nina Headshot.

References:

Bosworth, R.G. and Stone, A. (2021), Rapid Development of Perceptual Gaze Control in Hearing Native Signing Infants and Children. Developmental Science. Accepted Author Manuscript e13086. https://doi.org/10.1111/desc.13086
 

Huggamind (2014),  Infant Brain Stimulation: High-Contrast Research. Retrieved online July 25, 2021 from http://www.huggamind.com/highcontrast.php.
 

Thompson, R. H., Cotnoir-Bichelman, N. M., McKerchar, P. M., Tate, T. L., & Dancho, K. A. (2007). Enhancing early communication through infant sign training. Journal of applied behavior analysis, 40(1), 15–23. https://doi.org/10.1901/jaba.2007.23-06